Tag Archives: Exhibitions

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Special Collections is closed for the Christmas break from 23 December-3 January inclusive.   Join us then to meet the last 5 Objects in this exhibition.  Meanwhile, we’d like to wish everyone a very merry Christmas and a happy 2014.

BLP31Poinsettia cr

Our Christmas greeting, featuring a Poinsettia from one of our favourite books.

In Object no. 41 we glimpsed some Christmas fun at Bradford Technical College.

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Happy Holidays!

We’re taking a break for our summer holidays, but we’ll be back in September for the Autumn Term and the final ten.

Sun detail from front cover of Reason, April 1964 (archive ref HBP23).

Sun detail from front cover of Reason, April 1964 (archive ref HBP23).

If you’re new to the series and don’t know where to begin, here are six of the  most popular Objects to get you started.   Enjoy!

  1. Radical reading: Reynolds News, a popular but now rare newspaper
  2. The story of a modern icon, the “peace sign”
  3. Potential Graduate, a well-loved film about 1960s students at Bradford University
  4. J.B. Priestley’s wartime broadcasts which inspired a nation
  5. Dr Raistrick’s unique insights into the Yorkshire Dales
  6. A Land: Jacquetta Hawkes fused poetry and geology to tell Britain’s long story

A Cabinet of Gems

No new Object this week – we’re slowing the pace a little because the last few entries are having to be researched and written from scratch.

Meanwhile you might like another of our online creations, A Cabinet of Gems.  I’m using this to highlight amazing images from the collections, like this beautiful 1920s design found among the photographs of Jacquetta Hawkes.

1920s girl with headscarf on photo wallet from Camrbidge camera shop, HAW 18/2/5.

1920s girl with headscarf on photo wallet from Cambridge camera shop, HAW 18/2/5.

While we’re away …

We’re taking a little break, to edit broken links in our older stories, do some technical tweaks and research the final twenty.  Back in March!

Statue1gifMeanwhile, if you’re interested in J.B. Priestley, the J.B. Priestley Society has plenty to offer you!

The Society’s spring event explores the relatively unknown links between Priestley and another great British author.  Clockwork Orange author Anthony Burgess liked J.B. Priestley’s Image Men so much he read it ten times!   Dr Andrew Biswall, Director of the Burgess Foundation, explains, at this free event in Manchester on 16 March.  Full details on the Society website or see our Facebook event.

Taking a Movember break

Objects are taking a short break – join us again on 15 November for lots more. Meanwhile, here’s a look back at some of the stories of previous Objects, with a Movember theme!

Group photograph from the Bradford Technical College era.  Who are they?  We don’t know: do you have any idea?

Joseph Riley, a Bradford wool merchant who travelled on the Orient Express.

Joseph Riley

Joseph Riley

His son, Willie Riley, who became a writer late in life, creating Windyridge and other much-loved Yorkshire tales,

Willie Riley

Willie Riley

John Hartley, Yorkshire comic writer, of Clock Almanack fame,

John Hartley

John Hartley

And stories of Sir Isaac Holden, Bradford entrepeneur and politician: courtship of Sarah Sugden, his quarrel with Lister, his lost mansion – and there’s more to follow!

Taking a Summer Break

The Objects are taking a break for  summer holidays.  Here’s a look back at summer 2010 at the University … the feet are leading to the Wellbeing Week fete, which was on a beautiful sunny day (hope we get some of those this year!).  We wish all our colleagues and readers a lovely summer!

Painted feet leading to the Wellbeing fete, University of Bradford 2010

Painted feet leading to the Wellbeing fete, University of Bradford 2010

We’re back in August with lots more stories and pictures to share, including historic Yorkshire maps, feuding Bradford industrialists, a 1930s theatrical triumph, and, yes, J.B. Priestley’s pipes …

Objects taking a Break

No new Object in the week of 4 June because Special Collections is closed for the bank holidays.  Objects are back next week with more interesting stories to tell …