Tag Archives: Colleges

82. Italianate Baroque and Early Decorated Gothic: Historic Buildings at Emm Lane

This week, the story of two wonderful buildings which form part of the Bradford University School of Management.  Built within a decade of each other for very different purposes, both by local architects, they exemplify patterns in Bradford’s 19th century architecture.  The Emm Lane Building and Heaton Mount are situated in the leafy parkland campus of the Management School, about two and a half miles from the University’s main campus.

The front of Emm Lane building in 1996, Bradford University School of Management, from an MBA  prospectus (ref. UNI L88).

Entrance of Emm Lane Building, 1996, from an MBA prospectus (ref. UNI L88).

The Emm Lane Building was created between 1874 and 1877 as a theological college to educate ministers for the Congregational Church.  It was a new building for a college  whose long history dated back to 1756 and whose aim was to “educate young men for the Christian ministry”.

The architects, Bradford firm Lockwood and Mawson, shaped Victorian Bradford, designing both the Town Hall and the Wool Exchange (not to mention Saltaire!).   Like the former, the new Airedale Independent College had a Gothic flavour.  A report in the Leeds Mercury elaborated on the choice of Early Decorated Gothic style, considered to be particularly suitable for a college building; the architects would have liked to incorporate a “lofty and picturesque tower” into the design but this would have been too expensive.   The College building was made of “clean-cut wallstone from the Heaton quarries, with ashlar dressings” and enhanced with medieval details like the rather cute gargoyle dragon, below.

Stone dragon gargoyle, Emm Lane building, Bradford University School of Management, from flickr stream of sgwarnog2010, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 licence.

Stone dragon gargoyle, Emm Lane building, Bradford University School of Management, from flickr stream of sgwarnog2010, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 licence.

The foundation stone was laid on 16 October 1874 by Mr Titus Salt, treasurer of the institution.  His father, Sir Titus Salt, had helped support the foundation, but was too ill to attend (he died in 1876).   On 17 February 1888, for reasons of “financial economy and educational efficiency”, the Airedale College merged with the Rotherham Independent College.  The new organisation was named the Yorkshire United Independent College and based at the Bradford site.

Principal E. Griffith-Jones and Professors Duff, Armitage, Pope and Grieve on the steps of the Yorkshire United Independent College, Bradford (frontispiece of Souvenir and Programme of the 1913 Semi-Jubilee).  Now Emm Lane Building at the Bradford University School of Management

Principal E. Griffith-Jones and Professors Duff, Armitage, Pope and Grieve on the steps of the Yorkshire United Independent College, Bradford (frontispiece of Souvenir and Programme of the 1913 Semi-Jubilee).

By the late 1950s, the College faced dwindling student numbers and was due to merge with a college in Didsbury.  Meanwhile the newly established Bradford Institute of Technology was desperate for space, struggling to find room for the new staff, students and advanced work that its status as a College of Advanced Technology required.

Dustjacket (rather the worse for wear) of Yorkshire United Independent College by Wadworth (1954), featuring Emm Lane building.

Dustjacket (rather the worse for wear) of Yorkshire United Independent College by Wadsworth (1954), featuring Emm Lane building.

The Emm Lane Building offered a partial solution.  Purchased by BIT for £10,000, it became the home of the Department of Industrial Administration for Commerce.  In 1963, Emm Lane was designated The Management Centre; Tom Kempner was its first Director (the School celebrates its 50th anniversary this year).  The distinctive features of the College’s entrance, the “tripartite arcaded porch and large shafted oriel window”, have been part of the Centre’s marketing and visual identity ever since, witness this 1966 prospectus.

Prospectus for the Management Centre, Bradford University, 1966, showing entrance to Emm Lane building (ref. UNI L122).

Prospectus for the Management Centre, Bradford University, 1966, showing entrance to Emm Lane building (ref. UNI L122).

In 1967, BIT, which by this time had become a University, acquired Emm Lane’s near neighbour Heaton Mount.  This is a splendid “Italianate-Baroque” villa built for a wealthy wool manufacturer (see also Oakworth House!).  Heaton Mount was designed by local architect J.T. Fairbank for Robert Kell and completed in 1866.  It still boasts a terrace with splendid views, a magnificent staircase, stained glass, oak panelling, and a conservatory.   It remained in private hands until the mid-1950s (Kell and his wife until 1889, then the Ambler family, then Arthur Crossland) after which it became a convent school.  Alongside executive education, it offers facilities for conferences, weddings and other occasions.

Heaton Mount, Bradford University School of Management.  Detail from photo from Neil T's flickr stream (licence CC BY-SA 2.0).

Heaton Mount, Bradford University School of Management. Detail of photo from Neil T’s flickr stream (licence CC BY-SA 2.0).

Supplemented by several modern buildings, including a major programme completed in 2010, the Italianate villa and the Gothic college help make the Emm Lane campus a delightful setting which still gives a sense of Victorian Bradford.

Sources: this piece is based on many sources, including the National Heritage List via the English Heritage website, McKinlay’s Histories, articles in local newspapers, and books about the College at Emm Lane including Wadsworth’s history and the Souvenir of the Semi-jubilee of 1913.  Our academic colleague George Sheeran has written extensively  on Bradford’s historic buildings.  Quotations from English Heritage, a Leeds Mercury article of 17 October 1874, and Wadsworth’s book.

13: “From the Raw Material to the Finished Cloth”: Photographs of the new Textile Department, 1911

The Wool Scouring and Drying Room in the new Textile Block

The Wool Scouring and Drying Room in the new Textile Block

These fascinating images are taken from an album of photographs, part of the Bradford Technical College Archive.  The album was put together for the 1911 opening of a new textile department at Bradford Technical College, and was presented to Alderman William Warburton, Chairman of the City’s Education Committee: the College was at that stage in its history run by the City Council.  The photographs show the facilities of the new department, which was equipped with machinery similar to that students would encounter in textile mills, to carry out all operations from “the raw material to the finished cloth”.   The album also showed external views of the College buildings and equipment in the other departments, such as the Motor Car Engineering Laboratory (below).

Motor Car Engineering Laboratory

Motor Car Engineering Laboratory

The BTC had been founded in 1882, growing out of classes held by the Mechanics’ Institute.  Its teaching centred on the advanced skills required by Bradford’s industries.  The original departments were Textile Industries, Chemistry and Dyeing, Engineering and Art, plus a day science school, though by 1911, the Art department had become a separate School of Art, and the science school was closed.

Bradford Technical College is part of the heritage of both the University of Bradford and Bradford College.  In 1959, the BTC’s higher education strand became one of the Colleges of Advanced Technology (CATS), renamed the Bradford Institute of Technology, which later became the University of Bradford.  Find out more about the BTC and its successors on the Archive webpage.  The full story of the various institutions which are now Bradford College can be found on their 175 heroes exhibition web pages.

The new Textile Department, Bradford Technical College, 1911

The new Textile Department. The building survives as part of Bradford College, is now known as the Lister Building, and when we last heard was home to departments for law, arts and media.